Apr
21

Touchstone Story #78–Fighting Breast Cancer

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Cancer is the leading cause of death around the world, and breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed kind of cancer in women. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime, but early detection can help save lives.

Brenda Tibbetts Lund of the Cayman Islands was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1996. At the time, there was very little information about breast cancer available in Cayman, so Lund worked with the Tropical Gardens Lions Club of the Cayman Islands to establish an awareness program. The efforts of Lund and the Lions led to the area’s first annual 5K walk-run and awareness campaign, which was launched in 1997.

Carmin Godfrey of the Tropical Garden Lions Club said that the breast cancer awareness campaign “became our signature project, because it is an issue that is very dear to our hearts.”

Lund passed away in 1998, and the annual event was renamed the Brenda Tibbetts Lund Memorial 5K Walk/Run in her honor. Hundreds come out every year to support the event, support their community and feel empowered to make a difference.

“When I first found out I had breast cancer, I was very scared,” cancer survivor Becky Ebanks said. Finishing the 5K Walk/Run for the first time gave her a great sense of accomplishment. “My family walked with me. That was very important.”

The 5K is a visible sign of outreach, but it’s the conversations about cancer screening and awareness that happen because of the walk/run that really make the difference. As part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Tropical Gardens club organizes community forums every October in all seven districts on Grand Cayman. Topics covered in these forums include breast health, self-exams, mammograms and risk factors. The Lions provide vouchers for free mammograms to as many as 600 women a year who otherwise could not afford the cost of the screening.

Since the program’s launch, “the frequency at which you find advanced breast cancer has dropped tremendously,” said Dr. Steve Tomlinson. “Most we’ve seen now are stage 1, stage 2 cancers, with a higher cure rate.”

In addition to local efforts, the Lions Clubs International Foundation has supported cancer-related grants with donations totaling more than US$4 million. About 13,000 women in Venezuela received breast cancer screenings after an LCIF grant provided a mammography machine for District E-1 in Venezuela. In Lebanon and Jordan, Lions helped to equip three clinics that screen approximately 10,000 women every year.

“Education is key,” said Ebanks. “Women need to know they can take control of their health.”

Explore the exciting history of Lions Clubs International with our exclusive . Don’t forget to share these stories with new members so they gain an understanding of Lions history!

Stories from the Heart
Apr
18

“Stories from the Heart”

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“Stories from the Heart: Lions Serving the World One Person at a Time” is a book by Past International Director Robert Littlefield that relays how service to those in need transforms lives and gives individuals a sense of purpose. The designation “from the heart” was carefully chosen because it identifies a place of origin.

Using stories from the heart to relay how service to those in need transforms lives and creates a greater appreciation for the role that helping others can have on an individual’s sense of purpose. These stories detail Lions Clubs International and its impact on the world over the past one hundred years.

Celebrate Lions Clubs International Foundation’s (LCIF’s) 50th anniversary by ordering your copy; a portion of the proceeds will benefit LCIF.

Be sure to join us on Monday, July 2, 2018, at PID Littlefield’s campfire discussion at the 101st Lions Clubs International Convention in Las Vegas to learn more about the book and its stories. Immediately following the discussion, PID Littlefield will sign copies of his book in the Exhibit Hall. Don’t miss this unique opportunity!

Past International Director Robert Littlefield

About the Author
Robert S. Littlefield is Director of the Nicholson School of Communication at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. Formerly a Professor of Communication at North Dakota State University in Fargo, he has authored over 100 scholarly and
invited publications and several books. Littlefield began his service as a Fargo Lion in 1984 and has held leadership positions at the club, district, and global levels, including International Director from 2014—2016. A Progressive Melvin Jones Fellow and Second Century Ambassador, Littlefield was appointed to serve a three-year term as a Trustee for LCIF in 2016.

Apr
14

Touchstone Story–Project Martina

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For more than 15 years, Lions in Italy have been fighting cancer by helping the nation’s youth take steps to reduce their risk of cancer and understand the importance of early diagnosis and care.

In 1999, Lions in Padua, Italy, who were also doctors, began offering cancer education seminars at local high schools at the request of a local cancer awareness association. They taught warning signs and shared with the teenagers that living a healthy lifestyle—following a proper diet, avoiding smoking and being more physically active—can help reduce the risk of cancer.

The Lions knew without a doubt that the health education sessions had to continue once they heard the wish of Martina, a young woman with breast cancer. Martina’s fervent desire was simple: “that teenagers be precisely informed and educated about caring for their own health.”

Students and parents agreed. Each year, Lions, who were medical professionals participated in the cancer awareness seminars—called Project Martina—and improved and expanded the educational materials. Realizing they had developed something special, the Lions of District 108 TA3 in Northern Italy put their materials online, including slides, posters, handouts and questionnaires, so that Lions across Italy could implement the program in their schools as well.

By 2006, Project Martina was gaining recognition from the local government. By 2008, it had spread throughout Italy to other Lions districts. Italy’s education and health ministries endorsed the effort. And from 2011 to 2012, Lions in Italy designated Project Martina their national service project.

Through a series of lessons, Project Martina teaches how to prevent and fight cancer, and highlights specific forms such as breast cancer, cervical cancer, thyroid cancer and lymphoma. Cancers likely to be found in young adults, such as melanoma and testicular cancer, also have dedicated lessons. The seminars are always coordinated by a Lion, but other organizations and doctors who are not Lions recognize its value and sometimes partner with Lions clubs to implement Project Martina. A committee of science professionals periodically updates the lessons and slides.

Participant questionnaires are monitored for ways to improve the program, and the responses to the questionnaires continue to be overwhelmingly positive with nine out of 10 students saying they would recommend Project Martina to their peers. Some of the comments from the surveys include: “Thanks for opening up our eyes.” “Make these meetings mandatory.” “Being a smoker, I will think many times before I light the cigarette.” “Viva il Lions Club!”

Knowledge is key to early detection. Prompt diagnosis and treatment, as well as preventative care, can save lives today and for years to come. Leos are translating the materials so that Lions and Leos in other countries can implement the program as well. As of 2014, Project Martina could be found in Albania, China, Croatia and Slovenia.

Italy’s Lions and Leos are doing their part to spread the word about cancer awareness and prevention. But they are also creating new advocates. “I talked with my family,” one student shared. “My mother has decided to get her first mammogram.”

Explore the exciting history of Lions Clubs International with our exclusive Touchstone Stories series. They’re a great resource for promoting service at your club meetings!

 

Apr
9

Leo Club Awareness Month Checklist!

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April is Leo Club Awareness Month! During April, we encourage Lions and Leos to raise awareness of the importance of Leo clubs in their communities. Leo clubs create a platform for young people to serve as positive agents of change and develop into service-minded community leaders. For 60 years, Leo clubs have challenged the youth of the world to engage in local, national and international service, creating a network that today consists of over 7,000 clubs in over 146 countries.

Raise awareness about your Leo Club! Use this checklist to spread the word on the importance of Leos:

  • Update your social media profile picture with the #proudLEO filter
  • Plan a joint service project with local Lions clubs and post on social media with #LeoAwareness
  • Upload a photo or video with the #proudLEO hashtag and tell us why you serve
  • Share some of our downloadable badges on your social media pages
  • Get featured on Lions Instagram by sharing your favorite Leo service project with #LeoAwareness

Be sure to check out the Leo Awareness Month Toolkit for some great social media banners and badges. Follow the Leo Club Program Facebook page for more exciting stories and to learn about other opportunities to promote and celebrate Leo clubs.

Apr
7

Touchstone Story #76–Freedom to Move

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Lions in Australia and New Zealand are giving children with cerebral palsy—who are often confined to wheelchairs—a chance to stand on their own and to experience walking for the first time in their lives with a specialized piece of equipment known as the Hart Walker.

“The first time I saw a child with disabilities empowered by the Hart Walker, my heart nearly melted,” said International President Barry J. Palmer, an Australian who served from 2013 to 2014. “I feel the same way every single time I see children take their first steps in a Hart Walker.”

Developed in Britain in 1989 and refined through subsequent models, the Hart Walker has four wheels, a frame and complex bracing at the hips, knees and ankles that allow children who normally use wheelchairs to stand and propel themselves forward.

The new freedom of movement strengthens children’s underused muscles and lungs and boosts their confidence. But the walker is expensive, so Lions in Australia and New Zealand got to work bringing these amazing walkers at no cost to their families.

Children with mobility challenges can “walk with their mates, hold hands, they’re able to run,” said Cindy Shaw, an Australian whose quadriplegic son Adam received a walker from the Lions. “He feels very strong, and that he can do anything.”

Australian Lions have made the Hart Walker one of their signature programs. Since establishing the Australian Lions Children’s Mobility Foundation in 1999, Australian Lions have fitted more than 1,900 children with the walking devices. Palmer was a driving force in that effort.

In his inaugural address at the 2013 Lions Clubs International Convention in Hamburg, Germany, he told the audience how at a club in Australia he watched the moment a girl was put into a Hart Walker. “She smiles at us, gets this look of determination, then … she is walking.” The device had “changed her life.”

Similarly, in New Zealand, Lions have donated Hart Walkers to help many children. In the spring of 2009, then International President Al Brandel was visiting Wellington, New Zealand, and met 7-year-old Alyssa McCarty as she was being measured for adjustments to her Hart Walker. The retired New York City police detective sat on the floor for an extended chat with the girl and saw her stand. It was a moving experience, he said.

Later that year at the 2009 International Convention in Minneapolis, Multiple District 202 of New Zealand was recognized for its work with the Hart Walkers by receiving the Best District Service Project award at the International Hero Awards ceremony.

With the help of Lions, children once confined to wheelchairs can stand up, look their friends in the eye and join in the fun.

Explore the exciting history of Lions Clubs International with our exclusive Touchstone Stories series. Don’t forget to share these stories with new members so they gain an understanding of Lions history!

 

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