Mar
7

#LIONS100 Centennial Bus Tour Recap

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From February 18 to 27, 2016, the Lions Centennial Bus drove through 9 states in 9 days in the southern U.S. to help promote the Lions Centennial Celebration. During the tour, First Vice President Bob Corlew inducted new members, chartered new clubs and participated in service projects. View the Storify below or click here. (Use Firefox or Chrome as your browser for best viewing results.)

Mar
3

SightFirst Brings Clearer Vision to Timor Leste

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Timor Leste is a small county located in the southeast section of Indonesia, northwest of Australia. It has a population of just over a million people, half of whom are under the age of 18, with a majority living in rural areas. Timor Leste’s infrastructure was almost completely destroyed in the violence that followed the vote for independence in 1999, which also left the country without a viable health care workforce. The country continues to rely heavily on visiting teams from other countries while slowly trying to build its local health care capacity.

The Lions of Australia have a long history of support to Timor Leste, including leading teams to repair and build hospitals and schools, supplying medical aid and spectacles, and supporting the eye care and transportation of patients in remote areas.

When the Lions of Australia decided to apply for a SightFirst grant from Lions Clubs International Foundation (LCIF), a national eye health survey had found that 91 percent of people had reported a previous or current eye or vision problem, yet only 34 percent of these had ever sought out care. Many people did not know treatment was available or were not able to get to a doctor.  The survey indicated that approximately 47,000 people over the age of 40 had some sort visual impairment. It was determined that nearly all of these conditions are preventable or treatable.

The Lion undertook this project to build the country’s overall eye care capacity by strengthening existing eye care human resources and improving the infrastructure at the district level. Infrastructure upgrades include providing ophthalmic equipment to five eye clinics and establishing of a prosthetic eye lab.

This project is a collaboration between the Lions of Timor Leste, District 201-Q4, Lions Recycle for Sight Australia, the Ministry of Health and the RACS Timor Leste Eye Program.

Mar
2

Touchstone Story: The Lions Pride Expands

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In July 1987, at the Lions Clubs International Convention, delegates voted to open the association’s membership to women around the world.

While some early Lions clubs had women members, in 1918 the Lions Constitution was changed to limit membership to men. It would be almost 70 years before women would be once again welcomed into Lions Clubs International as members. In the meantime, many women volunteered alongside their husbands, friends and family members who were Lions. Some women formed Lioness clubs, the first of which was founded in 1920 in Quincy, Illinois, to support the activities of Lions clubs.

Lions began to take steps to open Lions membership to women in the 1980s at the same time as several lawsuits in the United States were challenging the right of private clubs to have men-only membership. A motion to include women was narrowly voted down at the Lions Clubs International Convention in 1986.

When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in May 1987 that a California law prohibiting sex discrimination by any “business establishment” applied to Rotary Club, LCI opened membership to women in the United States. Women around the globe were welcomed into membership shortly after at the international convention.

Just two months after the vote, 3,500 women had joined the organization, bringing fresh perspectives and additional hands for service. Within five years, Lions had 55,000 women members.

In the last 30 years, the proportion of women in Lions Clubs has grown significantly. In 2004, Lions began a task force to discover and plan community projects that are of interest to women, identify new members and promote and charter new clubs. By 2015, women accounted for 27 percent of Lions membership worldwide, and 38 percent of new members are women. In some parts of the world the numbers are even higher. Women make up 43.5 percent of Lions in the constitutional area spanning South America, Central America, the Caribbean and Mexico.

Lions’ strong service model is attractive to women who want to invest their time and energy into helping their communities. With their efforts and enthusiasm, Lions Clubs is a more thriving, global organization, ready for another century of service.

View the full collection of Touchstone Stories on Lions100.org!

Mar
2

Spreading #DignityHarmonyHumanity through Paper Cranes

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Japan legend promises that anyone who folds 1,000 cranes will be granted a wish. The wish of Lions clubs around the world is to spread #DignityHarmonyHumanity through service and international cooperation. Lions are fulfilling wishes of health, hope and a better life for millions of people.

Share a Crane – Promote #DignityHarmonyHumanity

Social media allows Lions to see how we’re helping around the world. Let’s use Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to see how far our #DignityHarmonyHumanity cranes can fly!

Fold a crane. Make a paper crane and write #DignityHarmonyHumanity on its wing.

Share a crane. Take a photo of your crane at a special place in your community or at the location of a Lions service project. Share your photo with the hashtag #DignityHarmonyHumanity on social media and on your Lions club Facebook page.

Give a crane. Give your paper crane to someone you know or leave the crane somewhere in your community for another person to find. Challenge other Lions and friends to do the same and spread #DignityHarmonyHumanity.

Feb
29

Flooding in Paraguay Won’t Interrupt Education

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When devastating floods hit Paraguay in December 2015, more than 130,000 people were displaced. As relief workers and supplies poured in, Lions Clubs International Foundation (LCIF) provided a US$200,000 Major Catastrophe grant.

Part of that grant money is being used to provide mobile classrooms, like those pictured here, to serve the 17,000 students affected by the flood. The Ministry of Education, in partnership with UNICEF and supported by LCIF, will provide 7 of these classrooms. They are made of durable materials and designed to stay 10 degrees cooler than the outside temperature. Each classroom can accommodate 50 students.

inside a mobile classroom

 

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