• #LDUN, Lions Day with the United Nations

    Recap: A Successful #LDUN

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016

    Read the Lions Day with the United Nations recap below, with social media posts from Lions, Leos, United Nations representatives and LCI partners. For best viewing results, use…

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  • Lions Free Store

    The Lions Free Store Fills the Need

    Monday, January 25, 2016

    Lion Mike Kerek is Secretary, Operations Chair, and Leo Advisor for the Reynoldsburg Lions, 2nd VDG and Communications Chair for District 13-F. Outside of Lions he is a…

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  • #LIONS100 Video: Growth and Expansion

    Tuesday, January 12, 2016

    “Lionism is a tremendous force…As Lions we are all going far beyond our political boundaries, building up a brotherhood among the citizens of our several countries.” – Dr….

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  • Potter Kai Fong with Japanese Exchange Student

    Leo to Lion Spotlight: Potter Kai Fong

    Thursday, January 7, 2016

    The Leo to Lion Spotlight will feature former Leos who have chosen to continue serving their communities as Lions to inspire other Leos to follow in their footsteps…

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  • CIMG3603

    SightFirst at Work in Africa

    Thursday, October 8, 2015

    During the August 2015 SightFirst Advisory Comittee (SAC) meeting, 13 grants were approved for vision projects in South Asia, totaling US$3,898,501. Cameroon, District 403- B1 A grant of US$1,148,905 was…

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lions-lingo
Jun
30

Touchstone Story: Lions Lingo

Author: Leave A Comment

Lions Clubs International has 11 official languages—Chinese, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish and Swedish. Some members might say it has an unofficial language, too: Lions Lingo.

Terms such as multiple district, Leo, Lions Quest, SightFirst, tail twister or club twinning can puzzle some members. Acronyms—including ID, PIP, OSEAL, FOLAC, PDG and LCIF—might add to the confusion. To help new members understand such words and phrases, the Salisbury Lions Club in North Carolina shares an eight-page document of regional and association-wide Lions terms compiled by Past District Governor (PDG) Jerry Austin. Although, as the club notes, “some ‘older’ members may likewise benefit by receiving a copy.”

With more than 1.4 million members in 210 countries and geographic areas around the globe, Lions expressions naturally vary from region to region. Lions in Austria have a slogan: “Wir helfen—persönlich, rasch und unbürokratisch,” which means “Lions help quickly, personally and without bureaucracy.” In Sweden, the phrase “Lions för samhällsansvar och livskvalité” means that Lions work together to improve the quality of life for everyone in society.

Whatever the language or the terms, Lions quickly connect with each other through service projects, fundraisers, social activities, regular meetings, social media and conventions. Association-wide campaigns, such as SightFirst and the Centennial Service Challenge, bring together Lions through common goals. Because as the universal Lions’ motto “We serve” suggests, together members can do more to help people in their local communities and meet humanitarian needs around the world.

In FOLAC, ANZI-Pacific, ISAAME, OSEAL and other constitutional areas, members come together under one name to serve: Lions. And whether they’re new or longtime Lions, most would admit that a handy glossary of Lions Lingo is always helpful.

View the entire Touchstone Story collection at Lions100.org!

 

SFK Logo cmyk
Jun
28

Walk the World with LCIF!

Author: Leave A Comment

LCIF is proud to partner with Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Companies to provide Sight for Kids.

Now, you can walk or run to raise money for Sight for Kids wherever you are in the world. Simply download the Charity Miles app on your smartphone, select “Sight for Kids,” and take a walk! LCIF will receive a donation for every mile logged. Supporting this vital initiative has never been easier!

Remember to share your journey on Facebook and Twitter with the #sightforkids hashtag. Then, watch for updates over the next year to see how far Lions and our friends have walked to save sight.
logo-charitymiles

2016 Parade of Nations
Jun
26

#LCICon 2016 Parade Results

Author: Leave A Comment

Below are the results from the 2016 Lions Clubs International Convention Parade of Nations, held this year in Fukuoka, Japan on June 24-28. Congratulations to all Lions across the globe!

Visit the LCICon Facebook page for videos, photos and updates from Fukuoka!

ALL STATE BAND
1) MD 30 – Mississippi All State Band
2) MD 10/11 – Michigan All State Band


MARCHING DELEGATIONS
1) (tie) MD 307 – INDONESIA
1) (tie) MD 101, 104, 106,107,109 – SCANDINAVIA: ALAND ISLANDS/ DENMARK/FAROE ISLANDS/FINLAND/ GREENLAND/ICELAND/NORWAY/SWEDEN
2) MD 306 – SRI LANKA
3) MD B – MEXICO
COMPETITIVE BANDS  – DIVISION II
1) MD 321 – INDIA (MD 316-318,321-324), Seika Girls High School Band
2) MD 103 – FRANCE, Kyushu Sangyo Kyushu High School Band PRECISION DEMONSTRATION UNIT  – DIVISION II
1) D303 – CHINA, HONG KONG/MACAO (DIST 303, MD 380 – MD 390)
lcif_h2c
Jun
22

Message from the Chairperson: Another Banner Year for our Great Foundation

Author: Leave A Comment

Dear Lions,PrestonJan2016

As I look back on this past year, I am overcome with gratitude. Serving as Chairperson of Lions Clubs International Foundation (LCIF) has given me so much to be thankful for, and I would like to take this opportunity to express that gratitude to each and every one of you.

Thank you, Lions, for your creative and meaningful work this year. The sheer volume of grant applications you have submitted to LCIF proves that we are expanding our humanitarian reach. We are only able to do this because of your unending dedication to service.

I would like to also thank our LCIF Board of Trustees, LCIF District and Multiple District Coordinators, district leaders and everyone who helped promote LCIF. You have done a great job raising awareness and increasing donations this year. Your work is vital to what we do.

Thank you for your generous support of LCIF. Because of you, we are treating the people we serve with dignity and working together in the spirit of harmony, all in the name of humanity.

Lastly, Joni and I want to thank the Lions of the world for your warm hospitality and your genuine friendship. You have welcomed us with open arms and shown us the true essence of Lionism.

Thank you for allowing me to serve as your Chairperson. It has been a great honor to represent you and LCIF, the greatest foundation in the world!

Together in Service,

Joe Preston
Chairperson, Lions Clubs International Foundation

Read the rest of the newsletter online.   

the-emblem
Jun
22

Touchstone Story: The Emblem

Author: Leave A Comment

Why is Lions’ cherished emblem so recognizable and memorable?

One reason is that Lions are almost everywhere around the globe, and Lions proudly wear, display and apply the brand on nearly everything. The emblem resonates because it brings up timeless associations with the image of the lion itself—strength, courage, action and fidelity.

When the Lions Clubs International was founded in 1917, Lions displayed both their pride and their sense of humor in creating the first Lions emblem.

As for their pride, the lion in the emblem was based on a famous painting by the 19th century French artist Rosa Bonheur of a regal lion at rest in the wild. The painting’s title, Old Monarch, become the nickname for Lions’ earliest members and clubs.

As for their humor, the first emblem was also a pun. The emblem depicted the lion holding a club in its mouth with the word “international” emblazoned on the club. The play on the words” lion” and “club” and “international” was clever, but by 1919 Lions asked its members to come up with a more polished logo.

Flooded with submissions from Lions members who were also amateur artists, Lions decided to form a committee at the 1919 International Convention in Chicago to acquire a proper, professional logo. The committee turned to Maurice Blink, a Chicago commercial artist and founding member. Blink created a sketch of circle with an “L” in the center and two lions’ heads in profile looking in opposite directions.

The Lions board of directors approved Blink’s design in April 1920. Melvin Jones explained its meaning. The emblem, Jones said, “represents a lion facing the past with pride and the future with confidence, looking in all directions to render service.”

In the earliest full-color expressions of Blink’s design, the twin lions looked a lot more like real lions with wavy dark brown manes, glowing eyes, and ferociously sharp, white teeth. Over the years, the lions became less fierce as the logo was standardized to promote consistent use worldwide.

Refreshed and updated again in the early 21st century, the emblem will likely serve for many more decades to come. And why not? It works.

View the entire collection of Touchstone Stories at Lions100.org!

Videos

What is Social Mobilization?

Friday, May 27, 2016

Social mobilization is a form of advocacy that Lions do very well! And, it is an important part of Lions Clubs International Foundation’s (LCIF) partnership with Gavi, the Vaccine…

Lions Take a Stand Against Measles

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Every child should be vaccinated against measles and rubella, but progress on eliminating these diseases has stalled. Everyone should play a role in closing this gap – governments,…

#LIONS100 Video: Peace and International Understanding

Thursday, April 7, 2016

“As citizens of the world, Lions respond to one need, one community, one life at a time. In the years, decades and centuries ahead, Lions will continue to…

LCIF Foundation

Message from the Chairperson: LCIF Supports Lions’ Compassionate Works

Monday, March 28, 2016

Dear Lions, Alongside Lions and our partners, we have made great strides in reducing measles deaths worldwide, but 400 people still die each day from this preventable disease….